Monitoring BPM with Digifit

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Yesterday I rode my bike to the climbing gym (Threshhold Climbing & Fitness) and then climbed at the gym, all the while monitoring my heart’s beats per minute (BPM). My goal is to keep my BPM under 150, even under 140 if possible. As you can tell, my heart rate spiked pretty high, but I was able to bring it down immediately. I think that soon I will have greater control over my heart rate.

Digifit

I tried several apps with my bluetooth heart monitor, and ended up using Digifit on my IPhone. I like Digifit because it is highly customizable and has crisp graphs and graphics. Most importantly to me, I am able to create my own heart rate zones and enable the voice feedback feature to notify me when I enter these zones. For cycling, zone 1=130-140, zone 2=140-150, and so forth. For climbing, zone 1=140-150, zone 2=150-160, etc. I set my zones up in this way so that the voice feedback doesn’t bother me at lower heart rates, only when I am approaching or within my prescribed max zones.

Results

Cycling Test: It was pretty hot for my bike ride, which made controlling my heart rate difficult. I also had a full stomach. If you look at the line graph, the biggest spike in BPM correlates with a big increase in elevation, thus a decrease in speed. As i kicked the bike into an easier gear and slowed down, my BPM quickly dropped to an acceptable level.  CLICK HERE FOR BIKE RIDE RESULTS

Climbing Test 1 (Lead Climbing): Lead sport climbing is climbing up a rock face and clipping your protection into pre drilled bolts as you climb up. This is typically more difficult and straining than top roping, which I am yet to test with my heart rate monitor. Lead climbing proved to really jack up my heart rate. This particular climb was only rated 5.9, yet it still sent my heart rate above 180 BPM. I may have to steer clear from this form of climbing for the next few months.                                                                    CLICK HERE FOR LEAD CLIMB RESULTS

Climbing Test 2 (Bouldering): I like Bouldering better anyway. Bouldering is climbing literally boulders without rope protection. Typically a boulderer will carry a ‘crash pad’ out and a friend to spot their landing to avoid injury. I had a much easier time controlling my heart rate during this short bouldering session. Boulder problems are rated and I usually max out at V6. I’ve only sent V7 a handful of times in the climbing gym. During this workout, you can clearly tell by my heart rate that I climbed 4 boulder problems. They were V1, V2, V3, V4 in that order. One important indicator that I’m doing an okay job here is to view the pie chart that presents the percentage of time spent in each zone. I only spend 3% of my time in the 150-160BPM zone. I believe that just like with cycling, soon I will have better control over my heart rate as I practice my breathing methods and body control.              CLICK HERE FOR BOULDERING RESULTS

Why is this important? Do I really need to obsess over this? This is empowering me to stay at my current fitness level without putting myself at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. I want to go into this surgery as fit and strong as possible, so that my recovery can be swift.

In other news, I went to the dentist yesterday to get my mouth ‘cleared’ of infection, cavities etc. Mouth infections can easily infect a defective heart valve, which would be a big risk before, during, and after a surgery. The surgeon requires a dentist to take X-rays and inspect the mouth. Luckily, despite my 3 year dentist visit abstinence (yikes) my dentist did not see any cavities/ infection and cleared me for surgery. This means that soon I will have a surgery date.

Also, a HUGE shout out to all of my friends, especially in this case my climbing friends who poured over their support for me! I would especially like to thank young Kristen and her dad Jess. Kristen has a similar heart issue as me and said she was climbing in yesterday’s climbing competition for me! Cheers!

Anthony

One thought on “Monitoring BPM with Digifit

  1. Pingback: Digifit Testimonial | Anthony's Heart Valve Replacement Saga

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